Why Boris Johnson's job-share would be good news for London business

With the mayor of London Boris Johnson set to decide between keeping his position or returning to government, business consultant Leon Emirali argues that a job-share might be a good idea.


With the mayor of London Boris Johnson set to decide between keeping his position or returning to government, business consultant Leon Emirali argues that a job-share might be a good idea.

Speculation that mayor of London Boris Johnson may seek a return to parliament as an MP in 2015 piqued last week.

According to several news sources, Boris is seeking to complete his final year as mayor whilst also representing a London constituency in the Commons.

Despite Labour’s last mayor, Ken Livingstone, setting the precedent for splitting his time between being an MP and mayor of London, Johnson has faced criticism from the opposition claiming that London will be void of leadership should he take a role in the Commons.

But would his proposed job-share provide a boost for London business?

There’s very little doubt that Boris is a true champion of London. He has consistently and doggedly lobbied the government for further investment in the capital. This is highlighted by Transport for London (TfL) securing a £16 billion windfall to fund Crossrail, the high frequency, high capacity railway project linking Heathrow to Canary Wharf via Heathrow, at the height of the government’s austerity plans.

More on Boris Johnson:

Johnson’s calls to attract the ‘best and brightest’ in business to the UK may help soften the government’s sometimes growth-stifling stance on immigration. His innovative support of small business, such as plans to turn disused garages into business space for start-ups, will boost the government’s agenda to help small businesses.

A backs-against-the-wall and sleeves-rolled-up approach to adversity, as demonstrated by mayor’s response to the riots and tube strikes, will add energy and dynamism to the Conservative-led economic recovery.

Politically, Johnson remains popular amongst grassroots Conservatives and the wider public. He can spend less political capital on driving through much-needed business rates reform than the likes of Cameron and Osborne, without being accused of ‘cosying up to cronies’.

With Johnson sitting in the Commons, or possibly in the cabinet, London’s industry will secure a valuable voice right at the heart of power, whilst retaining its visible and effective leadership.

Hunter Ruthven

Hunter Ruthven

Hunter was the Editor for GrowthBusiness.co.uk from 2012 to 2014, before moving on to Caspian Media Ltd to be Editor of Real Business.

Related Topics

Early Stage Funding